4MCA.com  /  Operation Reach Out: Suicide Prevention App

  1. Depression in the Military – and Holiday Stress, Too

    Because of the very nature of a military job, service members and their families are prone to depression. Combat, separation from loved ones, a sense of rootlessness due to constant Permanent Changes of Station and even the everyday stress of operational tempo can permanently alter the chemistry in your brain,...
  2. Healing Stress Injuries

    The stress of operational deployment can challenge service members and their families like few other experiences in life.It can also change them in many significant ways. The changes caused by a tough deployment can often be positive, including developing a greater appreciation for life and relationships, a greater level of...
  3. A Christmas Dinner

    A guest post from David J. Karwoski - John was a disabled Vietnam veteran who struggled with debilitating health issues as a result of the war. His daily struggles centered around diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and residual problems from malaria—not to mention the several pounds of metal used to hold his...
  4. America’s Homeless Heroes

    The most recent survey released by Housing and Urban Development and the Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that over 136,000 homeless veterans spent at least one night in homeless shelters sometime during 2009; on any given night, over 75,000 veterans sleep in homeless shelters or on the streets.  Other sources...
  5. Depression Facts

    Depression is a serious illness that requires treatment. People suffering with depression may have trouble with daily life for long periods of time. Different forms of Depression: Major Depression: Consists of severe symptoms that interfere with your ability to sleep, eat, study, work, and generally enjoy your life. Often, people...
  6. Need Someone to Talk To? A Guide to Getting Help

    They used to call being married to a soldier “the toughest job in the Army.”  Now more than ever, it still is, and sometimes we need some support. As military family members, it is important to remember that although most of us do not deploy or face combat situations, we...
  7. Don’t Let Depression Go Undetected

    Military personnel are exposed to elements that may cause depression on a more regular basis. Being away from loved ones for long periods of time, being in combat and the trauma of combat can cause feelings of loneliness, stress, and hopelessness. The constant strain of military life can have a...
  8. Give Homeless Veterans A Sense Of Home

    Though some might associate the term “homeless vets” with nothing more than a line from Billy Joel, the sad fact is that twenty-two years after the recording of “We Didn’t Start The Fire”, little has changed for returning soldiers. It is estimated that over 10,000 homeless veterans of the Iraq...
  9. Your Spouse Has Depression? Here’s How to Help.

    I have depression. Actually, if you want to be specific, my diagnosis is much longer and more detailed than that. Depression is a lot shorter to say and to type.  Let us not be prisoners of mere words and move forward together. I am lucky to have my spouse.  Not...
  10. Government Too Overwhelmed To Help Returning Vets With PTSD?

    It comes down to funding. And funding often comes down to perceived importance. If the government wishes to elevate something to “priority status”, be it alternative fuel sources, contraception, or the well-being of a returning warrior, the funding will materialize if those in power deem it important enough. So, why...